Tag Archives: Buddhism

Move Gently…

Excerpts from the final essay of Gary Snyder’s book The Practice of the Wild (1990). The essay’s title is “Survival and Sacrament.”

It’s not that I agree or disagree with everything written by Mr. Snyder, but rather something in these snippets poked at me. While reading, I frowned and I chuckled. I was surprised, hopeful and somber after reading this book and I look forward to discussing it with my daughter, who is also reading it as part of our 2-person book club!

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“It is said that about a million and a half species of animals and plants have been scientifically described, and that there are anywhere from ten to thirty million species of organisms on earth. Over half of all the species on earth are thought to live in the moist tropical forests (Wilson, 1989, 108). About half of those forests, in Asia, Africa, and South America, are already gone. (At the same time there are seven million homeless children on the streets of Brazil. Are vanishing trees being reborn as unwanted children?) A clearcut or even a mile-wide strip-mine pit will heal in geological time. The extinction of a species, each one a pilgrim of four billion years of evolution, is an irreversible loss. The ending of the lines of so many creatures with whom we have traveled this far is an occasion of profound sorrow and grief. Death can be accepted and to some degree transformed. But the loss of lineages and all their future young is not something to accept. It must be rigorously and intelligently resisted.”

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Filed under Buddhism, Nature, Writing

My Pen Keeps Running Out of Ink

Over the past week, I have been reading “The Earth Has a Soul, C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life”, edited by Meredith Sabini.

It speaks to me, what can I say.

I’ll admit this is one of those books that I already knew I’d love before I started to read it. By the time I finish it, I’ll have underlined nearly every sentence. To some it is a waste of time to do that, to underline or highlight,¬† but it’s a technique I use to slow down my eyes and my brain. It’s the same reason I write long hand, at least once a day. While the ink is soaking in (I use a fountain pen), I spend time with each word, letting the sentence linger and soak in.

I buy books like this all the time. Affirmation books. I read the jacket cover, or a summary or review on-line, and the author is on my wavelength. I think to myself, “See there, someone else who thinks like I do. I’m not a complete imbecile. My ideas and opinions have merit. At least one other person, and an author no less, is touched by what touches me. I’m not alone.”

But, I am also leaning in to disagreement and discomfort. There are authors of several blogs I now follow whose minds work in ways that are mysterious to me. So I sit with their words, letting them soak in. In some cases, I need to backtrack and read from their archives, or from responses they make to comments in an attempt to understand the foundation from which they write. I am not always successful, nor will I be. I am experiencing the emptiness of understanding. I will feel and understand differently each time I read, whether it be a piece familiar to me or untried. I am different each moment.

I have the most difficulty with poetry. I have read ten times the poetry in the past 2 months than I have read in my life. It is a worthy struggle. I am learning to let go of expectations and a mind that wants to jump immediately to categorization or answers or patterns and interpretations that are familiar to me.

I am learning to open to diversity and change. I am talking back to judgement.

I am learning to feel.

I am building connections not barriers.

It’s hard.



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Filed under Musings, Writing

May They Rest in Peace

Yesterday I laid to rest 2 digital manifestations of my psyche that were born, lived and died in an artificial reality.

Direct cost to live those lives: $14.99 a month.

Indirect cost of time lost in my real life: immeasurable.

Saluun and Sylamoon¬†would have been 5 years old at the end of the month. There was simply no way for all three of us to live together any longer. We had different ideas about how we wanted the rest of our lives to play out, so we agreed to go our separate ways. I’m still here, they are not.

Death of Saluun

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